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I thought the first question and answer in the following article might be of interest to my fellow XyWrite users.  We should be extremely thankful for Carl and Robert in their fight against the xp plague launched by mr. Gates.
 
                            Fort Worth Star-Telegram
                                       
                                       
                                       
                             March 18, 2005, Friday
                                       
 

KR-ACC-NO: FT-COMPUTER-COL-20050318
 
LENGTH: 1149 words
 
HEADLINE: Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Texas, Dr. Emilio Bombay column
 
BYLINE: By Michael Gerst
 

 BODY:
    QUESTION: I have a new Dell with Windows XP, and much to my consternation, I soon learned that it is not backward-compatible. I cannot run my older software.
 
   I just loved an old, old DOS chess game because I could occasionally win. I have been working with Dell support, but they want me to reprogram the computer. Yeah, right. Do you have a fix?
 
   --Backward Incompatibility
 
   A: Yes, it's called "getting over it." The problem isn't with Dell or even with Windows XP. It's with your sentimental attachment to things that just won't work on today's computers and operating systems.
 
   Windows XP operates much differently than its predecessors. It processes data differently, and it uses different built-in libraries of programming snippets. And DOS? Forget it. There's a DOS emulation window -- I suppose for the benefit of old codgers who still like doing things at the command line -- but it's not the real DOS that an older version of Windows had hiding at its core.
 
   So, there's no guarantee that programs that ran under Windows 95 or DOS or whatever you used to have will behave under XP. The only thing you can try is XP's compatibility mode.
 
   Right-click a shortcut to the old program, then pick "Properties." If you see a "Compatibility" tab on the properties display, click it and try making XP behave like its forefathers. I doubt you'll meet with any success with the DOS chess game. Are you so in love with it because it was the only game you could beat? Just wondering.
 
   I share your pain, though. I dearly miss being able to use  XYWRIGHT,  an ancient DOS-based word processor, under XP. It creeps along like a stuttering sloth now, and it's too painfully slow to be of any real use, not unlike me the mornings after my wife makes vodka surprise for dinner. I found a replacement for  XyWrite;  you need to find one for this chess program.
 
   If you're really hot to play it, though, and you can't find an XP version you can beat and you're very, very, very desperate, there may be a way.
 
   Microsoft makes something called Virtual PC, which lets you create a fake computer on your XP box. The virtual computer boots up in a window, and it looks like the real thing. You can load many different operating systems on separate virtual hard drives, and that means you can format the virtual drive in good ol' MS-DOS 6 or 5 or whatever.
 
   The real trick is finding a set of DOS installation floppies. Good luck with that. I found mine in a file cabinet I hadn't cleaned out in 12 years. There was some Kentucky Fried Chicken in there, too. At least, that's what I think it was.